How to Determine to Leave a Salaried Position for and Hourly Position

I recently got a job offer with a very large corporation.  I felt like I had found the golden ticket, but the catch was that I would work as a contractor for an hourly wage until I got hired on.  My long-term position would be performance driven, which doesn’t bother me, it was mainly the instability of the job.

What happens if I don’t get hired on after the trial period?  Eventually, I did have to decline the position after three counters from the company.  Right now, I need a job that provides benefits, as I was discussing with my friends and family, if I was married and had insurance through him, I would have taken this job in a heart-beat.  It would have been a lot of money and as my friends call it “clean cash.”  As a contractor, you do not have anything taken out, so you walk away with a lot of money in your pocket.

I put together a quick Excel sheet to compare what you would be losing at the job with benefits versus the hourly job.  These are not the actual numbers I ran, but I ended up figuring out I would lose money if I took the job.

As an hourly employee, you don’t get Federal holidays, snow days, sick leave, paid time off, or if we are in a state of emergency, an hourly employee doesn’t get back-pay.

Here is my Hourly vs Salary Excel cheat sheet to use if you are ever in the predicament.

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